DxSummit.org A Global Platform for Rethinking Mental Health

A Global Platform for Rethinking Mental Health

New site. Check it out!

About Something new is happening in the world of mental health. In recent years, professionals from across the varied mental health disciplines—psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, social workers, counselors, marriage and family therapists, and others—have begun to ask questions about some of the basic assumptions that form the very foundation of our work. At the heart of these questions is a growing doubt about the official diagnostic systems for mental disorder.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) are the two official diagnostic systems currently in use in the United States and abroad. Since the late 1970s, these parallel manuals have loosely followed the “neo-Kraepelinian” system, a categorical diagnostic paradigm containing criterion-based descriptions of mental disorders and their corresponding symptoms. The neo-Kraepelinian approach was expected to elevate psychiatric diagnosis to the standards of general medicine, and after its introduction, diagnosis became increasingly central to clinical research and practice. Today, researchers and practitioners across the globe use the DSM and ICD on a daily basis to understand and communicate about the mental distress reported by their patients, clients, and research participants. Over the past three decades, mental health practice has become virtually synonymous with the diagnosis of mental disorder. Read More: http://dxsummit.org/about

A Post-DSM Research Agenda

http://dxsummit.org/archives/340

 

Matrix BLUE Room

Diagnostic Manuals and New World Billing Codes: Can We Get Along?

The answer is no. Explaining how this is so in a blog is not realistic. It reminds me of when I was struggling with long-forgotten skills in advanced research design and analysis: As difficult as the statistics were, I had to take the word of others that any given formula was valid. It would have taken years of calculus and several chalk boards to “prove” just one equation.

Since it is clear that everything that we thought we knew is backwards, upside-down and inside-out, we are learning that Democide (death by government) is the leading cause of human demise. Things do not exist for the reasons that we think they do. Why should the American Psychological Association (APA), or the World Health Organization (WHO) have anything to do with wellness, as we understand it?

There has been a lot of buzz this week in regard to the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-V) and the rejection of it by the National Institutes for Mental Health (NIMH). It seemed too good to be true and this may be the case. For one analysis of this debacle: DSM, NIMH on mental illness: both miss relational, historical context of being human.

[Edit – 5/12/2012: The manuals go where the money flows. As nice as alternatives may seem, if the energy of our current exchange system is not addressed in some grand way, we are in trouble. OR: Until money is dealt with, as the Merovingian would say: The alternatives do not have a reason]

It only takes a moment of trying to get through the different systems to see that they are not in agreement. Were the creators of these ridiculous systems this stupid, or has it been by design? This may be a distraction from the fact that faster than you can say Agenda 21, we are moving toward a global standard.

Transition to the ICD-10-CM: What does it mean for psychologists?

Psychologists should be aware of and prepare for the mandatory shift to ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes in Oct. 2014

By Practice Research and Policy staff

Update: This article has been updated to reflect the announcement from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that the transition to ICD-10 will take place on Oct. 1, 2014, rather than Oct. 1, 2013.

Feb. 9, 2012—Beginning Oct. 1, 2014 all entities, including health care providers, covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) must convert to using the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code sets. The mandate represents a fundamental shift for many psychologists and other mental health professionals who are far more attuned to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

Most psychologists were trained using some version of DSM. For other health care providers, the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) – which contains a chapter on mental disorders – is the classification standard.

Over the years, efforts to harmonize these two classifications have resulted in systems with similar (often identical) codes and diagnostic names. In fact, even if psychologists record DSM diagnostic codes for billing purposes, payers recognize the codes as ICD-9-CM – the official version of ICD currently used in the United States. Since 2003, the ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes have been mandated for third-party billing and reporting by HIPAA for all electronic transactions for billing and reimbursement.

http://www.apapracticecentral.org/update/2012/02-09/transition.aspx

The ICD-11 is in-progress:

What to keep in mind and expect in the future

CMS announced that there will be no grace period for the implementation of the ICD-10-CM. As of midnight on Oct. 1, 2014, any claims filed for dates of service (for providers) or discharge dates (for hospitals) on or after this date must contain ICD-10-CM codes. Because this is a HIPAA mandate, penalties for failure to comply will be enforced. Civil and criminal penalties may include heavy fines and imprisonment. For more information visit the HHS.gov HIPAA privacy rule site.

WHO will be completing the preparation of ICD-11 at about the same time that NCHS will be implementing ICD-10-CM. However, it is highly unlikely that there will be a similar delay in ICD-11 implementation in the United States.

Through a series of annual updates over the first few years following ICD-10-CM implementation, the U.S. is expected to bring ICD-10-CM in line with ICD-11, so that the latest version of the ICD can be adopted smoothly and gradually without requiring a sudden and major change in the classification or how diagnoses are reported.

http://www.apapracticecentral.org/update/2012/02-09/transition.aspx

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